Guide to the Logical Fallacies

Stephen’s Guide to the Logical Fallacies – by Stephen Downes. Very interesting site with the fallacies definitions, examples and a way to proof the fallacies.

False Analogy
Definition:

In an analogy, two objects (or events), A and B are shown to be similar. Then it is argued that since A has property P, so also B must have property P. An analogy fails when the two objects, A and B, are different in a way which affects whether they both have property P.

Example: Employees are like nails. Just as nails must be hit in the head in order to make them work, so must employees.

(Thanks André!)

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4 Responses to Guide to the Logical Fallacies

  1. Bibi's box says:

    Fallacies

    And the issue is: Fallacy. In logic, fallacies of the latter sort are either formal or informal; because the validity of a deductive arguments depends on its form, a formal fallacy, or Logical fallacy, is a deductive argument which has an invalid form,…

  2. Bibi's box says:

    Fallacies

    And the issue is: Fallacy. In logic, fallacies of the latter sort are either formal or informal; because the validity of a deductive arguments depends on its form, a formal fallacy, or Logical fallacy, is a deductive argument which has an invalid form,…

  3. Bibi's box says:

    Fallacies

    And the issue is: Fallacy. In logic, fallacies of the latter sort are either formal or informal; because the validity of a deductive arguments depends on its form, a formal fallacy, or Logical fallacy, is a deductive argument which has an invalid form,…

  4. Bibi's box says:

    Fallacies

    And the issue is: Fallacy. In logic, fallacies of the latter sort are either formal or informal; because the validity of a deductive arguments depends on its form, a formal fallacy, or Logical fallacy, is a deductive argument which has an invalid form,…

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